Matching hypothesis and ucla dating study

The matching hypothesis is derived from the discipline of social psychology and was first proposed White conducted a study on dating couples at UCLA. July 17, Romantic attraction is commonly studied in the scientific literature, with idiosyncratic dating profiles, one profile imitating personality and relational characteristics similar to . supported the template matching hypothesis with opposite-gender parents with both The UCLA Loneliness Scale (Russell, ). UCLA dating study. to see if the matching hypothesis is due to real preference or settling. At first, people chose the person closest to their league, but if you tell.

Matching hypothesis :

However, the study lacks ecological validity: Social Exchange Theory 5. In one of the studies, the attractiveness of 60 males and 60 females were measured and their interactions were monitored.

Matching hypothesis and ucla dating study - 77 Cards in this Set

The participant usually chose the person rated as most attractive; however, the study has very flawed ecological validity as the relationship was certain, and in real life people wouldn't be certain hence are still more likely to choose someone of equal attractiveness to avoid possible rejection.

He stated that good physical matches may be conducive to good relationships. The study reported that partners most similar in physical attractiveness were found to rate themselves happier and report deeper feelings of love. If the partnership is weak, an individual may devalue it if they have many friends of the opposite sex who are more attractive.

They may look at the situation as having more options present that are more appealing. At the same time, if the relationship is strong, they may value the relationship more because they are passing up on these opportunities in order to remain in the relationship.

Participants viewed photos of couples who matched or did not match in physical attractiveness and completed a questionnaire. The questionnaire included ratings of how satisfied the couples appear in their current relationship, their potential marital satisfaction, how likely is it that they will break up and how likely it is that they will be good parents. Results showed that the attractive couple was rated as currently more satisfied than the non-matching couple, where the male was more attractive than the female.

Additionally, the unattractive male was rated as more satisfied currently and marital than the attractive female in the non-matching couple. The attractive woman was also rated as more satisfied currently and marital in the attractive couple. In one of the studies, the attractiveness of 60 males and 60 females were measured and their interactions were monitored. The people with whom they interacted were then monitored to see who they interacted with, and returned messages to.

What they found was different from the original construct of matching. People contacted others who were significantly more attractive than they were. However it was found that the person was more likely to reply if they were closer to the same level of attractiveness.

This study supported matching but not as something that is intentional. Huston - [5] Huston argued that the evidence for the matching hypothesis didn't come from matching but instead on the tendency of people to avoid rejection hence choosing someone similarly attractive to themselves, to avoid being rejected by someone more attractive than themselves. Huston attempted to prove this by showing participants photos of people who had already indicated that they would accept the participant as a partner.

The participant usually chose the person rated as most attractive; however, the study has very flawed ecological validity as the relationship was certain, and in real life people wouldn't be certain hence are still more likely to choose someone of equal attractiveness to avoid possible rejection. He stated that good physical matches may be conducive to good relationships.

The study reported that partners most similar in physical attractiveness were found to rate themselves happier and report deeper feelings of love nine months later. Brown - [ citation needed ] Brown argued for the matching hypothesis, but maintained that it results from a learned sense of what is "fitting" — we adjust our expectation of a partner in line with what we believe we have to offer others, instead of a fear of rejection.

Other Studies Further evidence supporting the matching hypothesis was found by: Importance of physical attractiveness in dating behavior. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 4 5 , Encyclopedia of human relationships pp.

Social Psychology 10th ed. Physical attractiveness and marital choice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 22 1 , Ambiguity of acceptance, social desirability, and dating choice. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 9 1 , Physical attractiveness and courtship progress. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 39 4 , Physical attractiveness and dating choice: A test of the matching hypothesis.

Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 7,